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Finnesterre to Muxia

Finnesterre to Muxia

I immediately fell asleep as the bus took me towards Finnesterre. Pretty country but nothing special until we arrived at the coast and my first glimpse of boats and even a small ship on the most beautiful clear and crisp autumn day. The great weather continued for my 2 days on the Costa Del Muerte. 

 

In spite of very poor signs I walked first to Cabo Finnesterre, the fabled end of the earth. I had wondered about this but when you are out there it’s like being on the bow of a ship at sea. Nothing else in sight but the open ocean. 

 

After walking back to the fishing/tourist town of Finnesterre I managed to put myself on the way for the 31 Km’s to Muxia. About halfway there I came upon a donativo place. No one was there to serve coffee so I called out. 3 guys I can only describe as old and aging hippies came out and  insisted that I come inside for a little food and drink. About an hour later I staggered out after having consumed beer, fries, half raw hamburger, and heard 3 life stories in Spanish. It’s all part of the day during a Camino in this remote part of the country. 

 

I met 2 Spanish peregrinos I have known for several weeks going the opposite way on the trail. Adios Victorino from the Canary Islands. Among other meetings were 3 French men I met separately who each told me they also started in Le Puy. Two of them hugged me when they found out where I started. They were nice moments and neither one kissed me for which I was thankful. 

 

Gallegos is a different language than traditional Spanish, and sounds a little like Portuguese. There is a separatist movement here as in the Basque region. All these regions making up t a  bit complicated but seems to work for the Spanish

 

The markings for the way were often not where they should have been, but I managed to find my way to Muxia. Not as much coast walking as I would have liked, but I did see a newly born calf struggle to its feet and meet its mom. My shin splints acted up again, so I guess I pushed myself a bit farther than I should have. I carried my regular backpack, and although it’s a lot lighter than it was, I felt the difference in various parts of my anatomy. Still, I have arrived (finally) at the end of this long Camino. An amazing journey that I’m just now beginning to comprehend. 

Because Muxia is such a special place, I’ll write a separate piece on it.









 

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